A Teenager Hacked A Bunch Of Tesla’s And Can Control Them

A Teenager Hacked A Bunch Of Tesla's And Can Control Them
A Teenager Hacked A Bunch Of Tesla’s And Can Control Them

Introduction:

A 19 years old boy, David Colombo alleged to have discovered a flaw in Tesla’s EV code that allows him to control the cars. He is a young German hacker and IT security expert. In a recent Tweet, he claimed to have full remote control of more than two dozen Tesla EVs spread throughout 13 various countries.

Software that is used to hack the code:

David did not specify which programme was utilized to accomplish this hack. However, he also stated in his statement that Tesla is not at fault for the vulnerability. Rather, it is the owners of the automobiles who are to blame. He expressly said that Tesla’s software system had no flaws.

He further clarified that ‘complete remote control’ does not imply that he can remotely drive the vehicle because he does not have control over features like as acceleration, steering, or braking. Even when the owner is not in the car, he can operate the sound systems, open doors and windows, disable security systems, and flash headlights.

‘’So, I now have full distant management of over 20 Tesla’s in 10 nations and there appears to be no method to discover the house owners and report it to them…’’ — David Colombo (@david_colombo_).

According to Colombo, the issue stems from the software’s unsecured storage of critical information required to link the automobiles to the programme. That information might be stolen and repurposed by hackers to transmit dangerous orders to the automobiles if it falls into the wrong hands, he warned. He showed Bloomberg screenshots of a private Twitter chat in which one of the impacted owners agreed to let him remotely sound his car’s horn.

“This shouldn’t happen,” Colombo said. “Especially if we’re putting cars on the internet and trying to make them secure. Everyone needs to work together.”

Tesla’s Action Taken:

Tesla, like many other technological businesses, offers a “bug bounty” programme through which cybersecurity experts can disclose flaws in the company and its products and, if proven, get cash. When vulnerabilities impact their goods, the corporation says it provides information and collaborates with third-party groups.

According to a news article, Tesla in the United States offers a platform where security experts may register their own cars for vulnerability reporting and tests, which can be pre-approved by Device manufacturers. If a flaw is discovered and proven, Tesla will pay a fee of $15,000.

According to an updated news story, he was afterwards approached by the vehicle company to examine the security problem. Colombo clarified that motives were not maligned. What Tesla has to say about the matter, on the other hand, remains to be seen.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs):

Which software is used to hack the code?

David did not specify which programme was utilized to accomplish this accomplishment.

Does David Colombo took complete remote control?

David Colombo clarified that ‘complete remote control’ does not imply that he can remotely drive the vehicle because he does not have control over features like as acceleration, steering, or braking.

What action Tesla’s took?

If a flaw is discovered and proven, Tesla will pay a fee of $15,000.

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